danadelions:

when you feel jealous or bitter over an artist’s achievements, always remember: people only show what they want to show of their art

 you would be surprised how hilariously bad some sketches of even experienced artists can look, and I don’t mean that in an insulting way. Also don’t think of the pics with the ‘man, such a sloppy doodle’ descriptions, I mean the truly horrible scribbles everybody does in their freetime. Even the most experienced artists have sketches that look like they had no orientation of lines in mind, with one arm going over the entire body and the other being half the length, etc, and that’s the COLD HARD AND WONDERFUL TRUTH

 No artist you look at does perfect work all the time, as hard as it is to imagine.
Any artist wants to give off the best impression they can, so frankly the very flawed looking stuff stays on a few papers at home without ever facing the internet or even close friends

 Similarily to how most people won’t go outside in a t-shirt with ten coffee stains and three holes in it, chances are you’ve never seen what /truly/ sloppy and disoriented sketches very good artists are capable of.

 So if something of yours doesn’t look perfect, and you look at people with all these wonderful sketches on the internet, remember; they very likely have those exact moments of doubt as well.

freeglassart asked:

You may get asked this a lot, so please excuse my ignorance - but how do you go about constructing character expressions and body language and such? Thanks!

makanidotdot:

Besides The Basics (construction of heads and skulls and muscles and skeletons and how they move), I’ll go over some things I’ve been trying to work on myself lately:

1. Treat expressions as a single gesture of the face/head, as opposed to a head and then individual features dumped on a plate and arranged into an expression.

First, just get down the big shapes of your expression, just like you would for a pose.  

So say I wanna do a low angle angry pose.  I know the features are gonna be all mashed down at the bottom because of perspective.

 Scribble it down

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start to put on features

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fix stuff

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put on more stuff

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fix stuff again

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erasing and flipping and stuff a whole bunch until you are happy with it or stop caring

Whole head is a gesture!image

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2. Just like a facial expression, jot down where the important parts of an entire pose goes first.  You can force the rest of the body to fit the pose.

So here I knew I wanted the shoulders tilted a certain direction, and te hand to be in that particular position in front of her face. 

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That’s the simplest explanation I got.  Don’t be afraid to push and pull faces and bodies around! Worry about being “on model” last!